Our websites use cookies on your device to give you the best user experience. By using our websites, you agree to the placement of these cookies. To learn more, read our privacy policy.

Qi Developer Conference Montreal

5 June 2018
Pavillons Lassonde, Polytechnique Montreal, 2500 Chemin de Polytechnique

Intended audience

The presentations will benefit product developers who have at least basic understanding of magnetic induction. It is not intended for novices. 

Morning Session

10:30 Beyond Compliance:  How to Build a Really Great Receiver Product David Wilson Kinetic Technologies, Inc.
 

This session explains in a simple way the basic technology of the wireless receiver, and most importantly, how to design and build a product that will achieve Qi compliance on the first try.  The main focus is the most important rules that must be followed, as well as specific problems that commonly happen that result in re-design, failures during Qi compliance testing, or bad experiences for real customers.  This is a very practical session, and these lessons come from real product examples that teach us how avoid repeating these unhappy experiences.

11:15 BREAK    
       
11:30 Methods for foreign object detection in inductive wireless charging Vladimir Muratov MediaTek
 

Making wireless charging ubiquities along with many other aspects requires addressing safety of technology implementations. Very early in Qi standard development foreign object detection was identified as important technology extension to prevent parasitic metal objects heat up when they accidently or purposely getting coupled into electromagnetic field.
The presentation discusses  principals and technical aspects of several methods employed currently by Qi wireless chargers to detect presence of potentially dangerous foreign objects before and during wireless power transfer.  Pros and cons of these methods along with intricacies of their implementations are also addressed.

 

Lunch 12:00 - 13:30 - Visit the exhibition

 

Afternoon Session

13:30 Qi Certification - compliance testing, interoperability testing and common pitfalls Menno Treffers Wireless Power Consortium
 

The rapid adoption of wireless charging has brought many low-quality products to market that are potentially unsafe.The first recall of a wireless charger was recently announced in Canada.

Products using the Qi standard must be tested rigorously to help ensure safety, interoperability and energy efficiency. Only products that have passed these independent laboratory tests can use the Qi logo and are considered “Qi Certified.”

This presentation discusses the requirements for:

  • Standard power transmitters and receivers.
  • Automotive transmitters for inline assembly
  • Subsystems and products that contain an embedded subsystem
  • Substantially similar products (variants of previously certified products)
14:00 BREAK    
 

 

14:15 Beyond Compliance:  How to Build a Really Great Transmitter Product David Wilson Kinetic Technologies, Inc.
 

This session explains in a simple way the basic technology of the wireless transmitter, and most importantly, how to design and build a product that will achieve Qi compliance on the first try.  The main focus is the most important rules that must be followed, as well as specific problems that commonly happen that result in re-design, failures during Qi compliance testing, or bad experiences for real customers.  This is a very practical session, and these lessons come from real product examples that teach us how to avoid repeating these unhappy experiences.

   
15:00 BREAK    
   
15:15 Measuring efficiency in the real world: A proposal for Energy Star John Perzow Wireless Power Consortium
 

Thirty-two five-watt wireless transmitters were purchased and tested for power-transfer efficiency. The experiment was performed to determine if a significant variance exists in the market to justify an Energy Star program. The test methodology and test results will be presented in this talk.

15:45 “Wireless Power for Residential Devices:  What is the Energy Penalty of Cutting the Cord? Suzanne Foster Porter Kannah Consulting
 

Power utilities such as California's PG&E are concened about a possible increase in energy consumption caused by wireless charging.

16:15 BREAK    
       
16:30 Non-functional requirements: the tradeoffs between power, transfer distance, and accuracy of positioning Menno Treffers Wireless Power Consortium
 

Key functional parameters of wireless power transfer are:

    a) Transfer distance (= how far can I move the receiver away from the transmitter?)
    b) Power level (=charging speed)
    c) Spatial freedom (= how accurate do I need to position the receiver?)

Interestingly, it’s the non-functional requirements that represent the biggest design hurdles to clear in getting to market-ready products. Examples of nonfunctional requirements -- things that consumers rightfully take for granted -- include safety, radio-frequency interference (RFI), power-transfer efficiency and cost.

These constraints limit the design space and make it necessary to prioritize the functionallity.

   
17:00 End of conference